6th Annual East Coast Vintage Nationals –Oreville, PA

6th Annual East Coast Vintage Nationals –Oreville, PA

Photos & Summary by Rolf Hill

Bruce Ristow was judged by Dick Teal to have the best restored Fox, a ’61 with a MC-90

On September 10 & 11, 2021 the Northeast Region VKA reconvened at the Oreville Speedway in Mertztown, PA for the 6th Annual EAST COAST VINTAGE KART NATIONALS. This event, though only two days in duration, had lofty aspirations. Not only was this event a regularly scheduled celebration of vintage karting, but it also coincided with INTERNATIONAL GO KART DAY. Additionally, this gathering also hosted a FOX KART REUNION, with Dick Teal, of Fox Karts fame, who graciously accepted the invitation to be our special guest. Finally, it was lost on no one that this weekend also marked 20 years since the terrorist attacks on September 11, 2001.

The gates officially opened on Friday at 10AM, though when I arrived “late”, at 10:05, there were quite a few canopies already erected. I was expecting the pits to be muddy, given the heavy rains that had passed through with Ida just a week before. I observed ducks swimming in the still-flooded front yard of a nearby farmhouse, yet the speedway property was, in fact, quite dry and solid underfoot. The track opened for practice at 12:00, and the afternoon was spent testing and tuning until 5pm. Of course,there was a lot of catching up to do with friends old and new. In particular,if you weren’t completely captivated by Dick Teal’s detailed observations and anecdotes, from his unique point of view,you just weren’t paying attention.

As we’ve done before, arrangements were made to meet in the evening at the local restaurant Florence Italian Grille. Per previous norms, we were expecting a core group of about a dozen. Our poor server… Inexplicably, we found ourselves pulling more tables and chairs together and our party eventually expanded to about 24 guests! These are tough times for understaffed restaurants, and this was a perfect storm. This woman -running mascara and all -maintained her pleasant composure -even as she was also responsible for a wedding party in another, different room! Recognizing that this was an untenable scenario, Natalie Bogerman and Ginny Hunter stepped in and assisted with such tasks as distributing menus and silverware, as well as directing traffic when food began to arrive. The food was great,and the conversations were excellent.

Karl Haydt spiced up the FOX display with this triple sporting MC-94s with dual carbs. That’s six carbs to adjust folks!

Unique among our Northeast events, with it usually reserved for Friday night, the first order of business on Saturday morning at Oreville wasthe Kart Show. This show was, for good reason, flush with Fox karts. I mean, Fox is always well represented in Vintage, but there was definitely an influx of Fox products for this Fox Reunion. Oreville Kart Club reportedly has a robust vintage racing class, and those regulars love Fox karts, too. Another perfect storm, but in a good way! In celebration of the Fox marque, Dick Teal was not just our Special Guest, but he was also asked to evaluate this field of Foxes to present awards for the “Best Restored” and “Best Modified” Fox karts. John Wolkiewicz, Sr., Chris Gruber and I were the judges for the regular array of Kart Show awards, and as a result, we were privileged to stand side by side with Dick Tealand hear his insight regarding the many nuances that he saw in each Fox kart that he inspected. Steering wheels, road wheels, brakes, the yellowing of clear seat piping over time, -the very thread used in the stitching of the upholstery -He took all of this into consideration as he evaluated each kart. His firsthand, original source expertise was incredible. Eventually Ginny Hunter’s Fox, with its West Bend 580was awarded “Best Restored”,and Carl Haydt’s Mercury powered Fox was awarded “Best Modified”.

After the Kart Show, it was time to get to the heats. First, though, we remembered those who were lost during andas a result of the 9/11 attacks,as we heard our National Anthem and observed a moment of silence for the fallen.

Mr. Fox Kart Dick Teal was on hand for the Fox Kart tribute.

The heats went off without incident! This track is short and fast, and this has led to a couple of hairy moments in years past. We were all very pleased with the good clean demonstrations of our vintage machinery and driving skill. Of course, the podium results will appear in a graphic somewhere nearby.

As always, I am grateful to the staff at Oreville Speedway. They have been professional and gracious in years past, and they seemed especially so this year. Alex Greenzweig and Kenny Denglermade sure to make us feel welcome, and the other staff members were quick to help in whatever ways they could. Thanks, too, to the folks who plan and negotiate and arrange these events, including Skip Owen, Karl Ginter, and Sal Palatucci. It was another (another!) great weekend of Vintage Karting Fun!

Show Results

Karl also won the Peoples Choice award with his Mercury outboard-powered FOX.
The East Coast is rear-engine country and the fields in the rear engine classes were robust.
Oreville is a challenging track with sections like this downhill sweeper that required plenty of body English from the rear competitors.
Yamaha Limited Pipe Specifications

Yamaha Limited Pipe Specifications

By Lynn Haddock

The approved RLV PIPES for the Yamaha Limited Class (#17) are the VKA-K1, VKA-K2 and the VKA-SR-Y.

These are the same pipes as the older model KPV K1 and K2 and the WKA/IKF SR-Y. These are readily available in the used market.

The current RLV HEADERS are the VKA-9110 (12 degrees) and the VKA-9110 (straight). However, any straight tube header may also be used. No tapered tube headers are allowed!

The minimum length for all the pipes is 12″ from the piston face to the start of the first cone. For convenience, the edge of the fin just above the exhaust (see Fig. 1, below) is 2.4″ from the piston.

 

FOR THE 90° PIPE

For the 90° models (K1+K2), this means, in order to have a minimum distance from the piston face to the end of the connector tube as 12″, the connector dimension has a combination of 2.4” + 9.6” = 12″ (see Fig. 2, below).

 

FOR THE 60°/30° PIPE

Unlike the 90° model, the 60°/30° model has 2.5″ of distance is made into the 60°/30° elbow (see Fig. 3), so the distance from the piston to the end of the connector tube is 9.5″ (2.4″ + 7.1″) minimum (see Fig. 4) and the overall minimum distance is 12″ (2.4″ + 7.1″ + 2.5″ = 12″).

There is no maximum length for any header. The connector tube is 1.750″ diameter.

For information on the RLV pipes go to: www.RLVcatelog.com. On the left, at the bottom, click on VKA Vintage Pipes. This page with the 90° and 60°/30° pipes will come up.

RLV PIPE CLARIFICATION BY LYNN HADDOCK

Several questions have arisen regarding the RLV pipe and the proper installation. Below is a picture of the 90° pipe (Fig. A) and the correct, minimum length of the connector tube (Fig. B)

Figure A
Figure B

Fig. C shows the 60°/30° pipe, and Fig. D shows the proper installation of the minimum connector tube.

Figure C
Figure D
History Lesson: Scott Kneisel Rebuilds the Mc8

History Lesson: Scott Kneisel Rebuilds the Mc8

As we have changed over from the old VKA website to the current one, some of the links to articles and photos just stopped working. Ryan Courts made a PDF copy of Scott Kneisel’ss Mc8 rebuild article and put it up on the VKA Facebook page. Although most of the information is specific to Mc8s, Scott’s 2-stroke rebuilding techniques (measuring/installing seals and bearings etc.) apply to virtually all kart engines.

As we recover some of this “old gold” we will repost it in its respective category on the new site. However, in an effort to conserve space on our new site, we will simply have a descriptive paragraph and photo about the content of the article followed by a new link to where it is archived.

Comments and suggestions always welcomed!

10th Annual VKA CAMDEN Vintage Event

10th Annual VKA CAMDEN Vintage Event

Camden, Ohio Aug. 26 -28, 2021

by Sherri and Jeff Brown

Another fabulous event.  Sure, it was hot, but look at the calendar … it was August!  Despite the heat and some lingering concerns about COVID … not to mention some personal issues and schedule conflicts with some larger teams … we had 78 entrants plus a couple practice-only. 

We had the pleasure of acknowledging several truly honorable, WKA Hall of Fame Members, and we were able to surprise one new inductee.  (Haul of Famers, Ron and Carma Withrow, Paul Martin, Neil Keller, Gary Gregg and Randy Kugler are pictured), but it was Gary Gregg, the owner of G & J Kartway and long-time supporter of karting who was totally taken off guard when his name was announced.   It was a pleasure to recognize his lifelong contribution to karting, WKA (founded at Camden), and Ohio Valley Karting Association (OVKA). 

We ran the scheduled 1st Heat on Friday, followed by the Kart Show and dinner.  Thanks to Romero Llamas, the Kart Show was a big success.   Check out the amazing karts that topped the list. 

Historic- Rathman Exterminator; Larry Stallard
Restored Historic; ’61 Big J Lancer; WB-820; Gordon Juhasz
Modified Historic; ’60 Simplex Challenger IV; Dual WB-820; John Gillman
Restored Rear Engine; ’67 Rupp Chaparral; MC-91; Chris Taylor
Modified Rear Engine; ’66 Rupp A-Bone; MC-91b; Jake Gillman
Past Champion Rear Engine; ’64 Fox Box Mount; 91b1- Rolf Hill 
Restored Sidewinder; “87 Margay Xpert; KT-100; Bill Arrandale
Past Champion Sidewinder; ’73 Bug; MC 91b1; Dan Bucher
Restored Sidewinder- ’78 Margay Pro X; Yamaha; Joe Cramer
PEOPLES’ CHOICE- ’78 Margay Pro X; Yamaha; Joe Cramer

Our President, Gary Wlodarsky and Track Cook/Clutch Guy, Jim Donovan served up a great meal of corn on the cob, burgers, bratts, complete with the sides and desert donated by Joann Hertzig.  I don’t think anyone went away hungry. 

Despite a “pop-up” deluge/mini hurricane after dinner, the track was fine for the two Heats on Saturday.  The results are below.  Our congratulations to all 78 entrants for some great demonstrations of what these old karts can do.  It was a safe event.  Everyone went home in the car/truck they came in. 

We can’t forget our hosts, the OVKA.  As always, they are the most accommodating and congenial group of track workers and flaggers, announcers, concession workers and registrations help.  Thank you.  And thanks to all who came.  God bless America.  See you next year.

Yamaha Piston Port Heat 1 start led off by Pete Vetter #23 and Ron Funkhauser #3
WKA Hall of Famers Ron & Carma Withrow (seated), Paul Martin, Neil Keller, Gary Gregg & Randy Kugler (standing left to right)
Looks like a fun ride – CKS sidewinder with TKM reed power
The essence of karting – a rear-engined SAE with a pair of Macs
No action shots, but Daniel Birges BM130-powered C/Open is worth looking at regardless of speed
Much credit to the events success goes to the Ohio Valley Karting Association
N.E. Regional Coordinator Skip Owen ran several classes with his beautifully prepared karts. This is his Sportsman Sidewinder entry.
Nice turn-key Margay Cheetah for sale. Lots of stuff for sale at most VKA events
Sportsman Sidewinder Heat 1 start with #85 Al Hasenfratz off the mark first, followed by Skip Owen #32 and Karl Ginter #3
150cc Sidewinder Heat 1 start with Craig Bennett on pole and Larry Pike #51 off pole
Restored Sidewinder & People’s Choice Winner, Joe Cramer cleaned up with his Yamaha-powered ’78 Margay Pro X
Sidewinder Past Champion Dan Bucher’s ’73 Bug with MC91b1 power is still looking good
Past Champion Rear Engine – Rolf Hill’s ’64 Fox Box Mount MC91b1
Jake Gillman’s ’66 Rupp A-Bone with MC91b power won the Modified Rear Engine class
Chris Taylor’s ’67 Rupp Chaparrel with MC91 power took Restored Rear Engine honors
Modified Historic was won by John Gillman ’60 Simplex Challenger IV, with dual WB820s
Restored Historic winner was Gordon Juhasz’s ’61 Big J Lancer with WB820 power
Historic winner was Larry Stallard’s Rathman Exterminator
Happy warriors Mark Story (getting ready to ride) and Daniel Birge soldier on in C/Open SW. Mark’s Emmick Elite was once owned and raced by West Coast George Ito. Now has K30 power
It was hot and sticky at Camden with everyone seeking refuge under any awning and tarp they could
A unique feature at Camden was the speed trap at the end of the straight. Here Pete Vetter clicks off a 56mph in Yamaha Piston Port. Craig Bennett tripped the clocks at 77mph in his C/Open sidewinder

Saving Those Heads

Saving Those Heads

How to Fix Destroyed Vintage Cylinder Heads

By Len Emanuelson

One of the real issues with running vintage kart motors is
that the parts are hard to find and are getting very expensive. There are a few
engines like TKM and a few IAME based engines that you can still buy new
replacement parts, but a typical cylinder head can be $250 or more. So it pays
to try to salvage what you have if you can. In most cases all that’s required
is a manual lathe and a $60 arbor from LAD.

I’m no machinist, but I have a lathe, and at the rate I blow
stuff up, I fix my own engines. In this case a friend brought me a TKM 150cc
cylinder head that had been pretty well beaten up by a piston failure. As you
can see in the “before” photo, we mapped out our strategy by numbering the
sequence of the surfaces to be machined. The objective is to end up with the
squish band the same relative distance from the sealing surface as it was
before machining. Another objective is to remove the least amount of material
possible, because it is the head’s total mass that acts as a heat sink, and
keeps your air-cooled motor cooling as efficiently as possible.

Follow along as we bring this cylinder head back
to life in less than one hour of time in the shop.

Step 1

First, inspect the damage to see if the head is even repairable without welding. We decided to first machine the cylinder sealing surface (#1) .020”, the head-to-muff surface (#2) .020” second and the squish band (#3) .020” third. If the squish band did not clean up at .020” we would have started over on all three surfaces with an additional .010” cut. The object is to remove the least possible amount of material and still restore the surfaces.
First, inspect the damage to see if the head is even repairable without welding. We decided to first machine the cylinder sealing surface (#1) .020”, the head-to-muff surface (#2) .020” second and the squish band (#3) .020” third. If the squish band did not clean up at .020” we would have started over on all three surfaces with an additional .010” cut. The object is to remove the least possible amount of material and still restore the surfaces.

Step 2

Here is the LAD cylinder head mandrel. It fits into the lathe chuck or collet and then the head screws on to the mandrel via the sparkplug threads.
Here is the LAD cylinder head mandrel. It fits into the lathe chuck or collet and then the head screws on to the mandrel via the sparkplug threads.

Step 3 & 4

Step3
The mandrel should stick out of the lathe chuck or collet just enough to screw on the head and clear the fins. This provides the least amount of runout for accurate machining.
The mandrel should stick out of the lathe chuck or collet just enough to screw on the head and clear the fins. This provides the least amount of runout for accurate machining.

Step 5

We first machined the head-to-barrel sealing surface. To do this we ran the lathe in reverse (clockwise) so that we could easily see the cutting tool. Important because the tool must cut all the way into the corner of the “step” for the liner. The cylinder must be very tight on the mandrel or it will unscrew from the force of the cutting tool.
We first machined the head-to-barrel sealing surface. To do this we ran the lathe in reverse (clockwise) so that we could easily see the cutting tool. Important because the tool must cut all the way into the corner of the “step” for the liner. The cylinder must be very tight on the mandrel or it will unscrew from the force of the cutting tool.

Step 6

Next we cut the surface above the muff. We ran the lathe in the normal rotation (CCW) for this operation.
Next we cut the surface above the muff. We ran the lathe in the normal rotation (CCW) for this operation.

Step 7

The angled squish band is machined with the “compound” part of the lathe. Foreign motors like the TKM, most Komets, etc. use approximately an 11.5-degree angle on the squish band. A good way to check the angle your compound (without the lathe running) is to touch-off the cutting tool on the inside edge of the squish band, back the tool carriage off .010” and then move the cutting tool to the outside edge of the squish band with the compound. It should be .010” away from the squish band if the compound angle is set correctly. If not adjust.
The angled squish band is machined with the “compound” part of the lathe. Foreign motors like the TKM, most Komets, etc. use approximately an 11.5-degree angle on the squish band. A good way to check the angle your compound (without the lathe running) is to touch-off the cutting tool on the inside edge of the squish band, back the tool carriage off .010” and then move the cutting tool to the outside edge of the squish band with the compound. It should be .010” away from the squish band if the compound angle is set correctly. If not adjust.

Step 8 & 9

Step8
After cutting the squish band the bowl-to-band parting line was still in pretty rough shape. We readjusted the cutting tool and took a light cut on the outside edge of the bowl area until the damaged area was gone.
After cutting the squish band the bowl-to-band parting line was still in pretty rough shape. We readjusted the cutting tool and took a light cut on the outside edge of the bowl area until the damaged area was gone.

Step 10

A piece of 400 grit sandpaper was used to blend the angle cuts and damage in the bowl area. Probably not how your shop teacher showed you how to do it, but as you can see in the finished photo, it works.
A piece of 400 grit sandpaper was used to blend the angle cuts and damage in the bowl area. Probably not how your shop teacher showed you how to do it, but as you can see in the finished photo, it works.

Step 11

The final check is to make sure the squish band is the correct diameter for your engine’s bore. We are using a 58.8mm piston, so the 58.85mm size is just about right. If your diameter is too small, cut the squish band deeper. If it is too big, cut the cylinder sealing surface some more. After you do a couple of these you’ll get the hang of juggling the dimensions for the desired results.
The final check is to make sure the squish band is the correct diameter for your engine’s bore. We are using a 58.8mm piston, so the 58.85mm size is just about right. If your diameter is too small, cut the squish band deeper. If it is too big, cut the cylinder sealing surface some more. After you do a couple of these you’ll get the hang of juggling the dimensions for the desired results.